Meet the Animals

Stella

  • stella

Stella is a Holland Lop Eared Rabbit. She came to Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve in March of 2012. While there are several types of lop eared rabbits, Holland lops are the smallest. Although she is diminutive in stature, Stella is quite large on personality. Commonly found in her day time pen during Environmental Learning Barn open hours, Stella is usually one of the first to greet folks with her friendly and approachable nature. Her friendly personality and often comical antics have made Stella a favorite feature of visiting the Barn. It is safe to say that Stella has become a Latrobe community treasure.

Jasper & Jasmine

Jasper and Jasmine are Eastern Box Turtles. Jasper, the male, can be distinguished by his red eyes, a characteristic displayed by all male box turtles. Jasmine is believed to be the older of the two. Although her exact age is not known, she is believed to be quite old. In the wild, box turtles will live approximately 30-40 years. In captivity, however, where they are kept away from predators, are fed regularly and properly, and treated for illnesses, box turtles have been known to live up to 100 years! Jasper and Jasmine have been with us here at WPNR since we opened in 2007. Confiscated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from an illegal breeding operation, they were deemed unable to be released into the wild and donated to our organization to be utilized as education animals. Although Eastern Box Turtles are the most common of the Box Turtles, they are listed as ‘vulnerable’. Some ways to help Jasper and Jasmine’s wild counterparts are to leave piles of leaves for potential overwintering habitat (this works for many other types of creatures as well) and generally leaving them be when you see them in the wild. If you happen to see one trying to cross a busy road, the kindest thing to do would be to gently pick them up and move them to the side of the road in which they were traveling. Do not take them back in the other direction as they will simply try to cross again, and don’t travel with them to a new location as you could potentially releasing them in another creature’s territory.

Croaky

Our resident bullfrog, Croaky, was donated to WPNR by the biology lab at Saint Vincent College. She now lives a comfortable life as one of our education ambassadors. She arrived at WPNR in September of 2013 and was named during a naming contest by a local 5th grader. Bullfrogs are one of the most common frogs in Pennsylvania and are named for the ‘bull’ like sound that they make, a sound that can often be heard from Croaky on quiet days.

Leopard Frogs

Our leopard frogs were also donated by the biology lab at SVC. They arrived to WPNR at the end of the fall semester of 2015. Ours are northern leopard frogs and they are commonly found in Pennsylvania. Named for their spotted patterns, they can often be found in ponds, wetlands, and streams.

Red Worms

Did you know that we have worms at WPNR? If you’re not aware of them, they’re easy to miss. Ask a staff member about them next time you visit. We love to talk about them! They are part of a vermicomposting bin located in our downstairs classroom area. ‘Vermi’ comes from the Latin word for worm so vermicomposting means to compost with worms. Stop by to get more information on how it works and how to get your own vermicomposting bin!

Bird Feeders

There are a wide variety of bird species that call the grounds at WPNR home. Many of the songbirds here are attracted by our series of bird feeders located at the back patio area. Just a few species of birds that can be commonly found at our feeder stations are cardinals, tufted titmice, chickadees, blue jays, robins, sparrows, finches, nuthatches, and various woodpeckers. We’ve also been known to get some orioles and towhees. We’ve even seen a spectacular male pheasant feeding out there! Although the feeders are meant for birds, we do get various other types of creatures out there such as squirrels and chipmunks. Its not at all uncommon to see the back end of a groundhog hanging out of the feeders!